AS-AP

Survey: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Posted August 05, 2010 by Anonymous
Part 1.
Year Founded: 
Before 1950
1c. Organization's annual budget.: 
Over $1,000,000
1b. Primary activity[ies] of the organization.: 
Exhibition Space
Part 2.
2a. Mission Statement: 
2005 - Mission Statement The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is a dynamic center for modern and contemporary art. The Museum strives to engage and inspire a diverse range of audiences by pursuing an innovative program of exhibitions, education, publications, and collections activities. International in scope, while reflecting the distinctive character of our region, the Museum explores compelling expressions of visual culture.
Website Link to Mission Statement: 
http://www.sfmoma.org/info/mushist_overview.asp
2b. Organization History / Organizational Overview. Index of important events in organization's history.: 
Mission Statement The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is a dynamic center for modern and contemporary art. The Museum strives to engage and inspire a diverse range of audiences by pursuing an innovative program of exhibitions, education, publications, and collections activities. International in scope, while reflecting the distinctive character of our region, the Museum explores compelling expressions of visual culture. The first museum on the West Coast devoted solely to 20th-century art, the San Francisco Museum of Art opened in 1935 under the direction of Grace L. McCann Morley. After her 23-year tenure, Morley was succeeded as Museum director by George D. Culler (1958–65) and Gerald Nordland (1966–72). The Museum, which celebrated its 50th anniversary in 1985, rose to international prominence under the leadership of Henry T. Hopkins (1974–86). "Modern" was added to the Museum’s title in 1975 to describe its purview more accurately. John R. Lane was appointed director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) from 1987 to 1997. Under his direction, the Museum established three new curatorial posts—curator of painting and sculpture, curator of architecture and design and curator of media arts—and elevated the positions of director of education and director of photography to full curatorial roles. Subsequently, SFMOMA undertook an extremely active special exhibitions program, both organizing and hosting traveling exhibitions. In January 1995, SFMOMA opened a new museum facility in the burgeoning South of Market district, designed by renowned Swiss architect Mario Botta. David A. Ross was director of SFMOMA from June 1998 to August 2001. During his tenure, Ross was instrumental in the acquisition of a number of major works of art for the permanent collection, including 22 seminal pieces by Ellsworth Kelly; 14 important works by Robert Rauschenberg; René Magritte’s Les Valeurs personelles, (Personal Values; 1952); two important late paintings by Piet Mondrian: Composition with Red, Yellow and Blue (1935–42) and New York City 2 (Unfinished), 1941; a lead airplane sculpture by Anselm Kiefer entitled Melancholia (1990–91); and Marcel Duchamp’s iconic Fountain (1917/1964). Ross steered the museum through an unprecedented period of growth, during which time the Museum’s membership grew to more than 44,000 people and the permanent collection to more than 22,000 objects. He was particularly interested in artists exploring the intersection of art and technology, a theme carried out in such exhibitions as Bill Viola, Seeing Time: Selections from the Pamela and Richard Kramlich Collection of Media Art and the groundbreaking 010101: Art in Technological Times. Neal Benezra succeeded David Ross as director in 2002, assuming his new role in August. The following year, SFMOMA presented the phenomenally successful Marc Chagall exhibition, hosting more than 115,000 visitors in October—more than any other month in its history. Also in 2003 the Museum’s Koret Visitor Education Center, the only educational facility at an American art museum to offer drop-in public access, celebrated its first anniversary. SFMOMA continued breaking records in 2004 with almost 800,000 total visitors and a 36 percent increase in membership, giving it the largest member base of any modern or contemporary art museum in the country. Among the nearly 600 works acquired in 2004, of particular note were Suspension of Disbelief (for Marine) (1991–92), a video installation by Gary Hill; Tide Table (2003), a film and suite of related drawings by the South African artist William Kentridge; and Atrabiliarios (1992–2004), a mixed-media installation by the Columbian artist Doris Salcedo. Prentice and Paul Sack made a promised gift of nearly 800 photographs from their private collection to the Prentice and Paul Sack Photographic Trust. And in 2005 SFMOMA inaugurated the immensely popular Modern Ball, a spring fundraising gala to be held biennially. 1935 On January 18, the San Francisco Museum of Art, under the leadership of founding director Grace L. McCann. Morley, opens on the fourth floor of the War Memorial Veterans Building on Van Ness Avenue. A gift of 36 works from Albert M. Bender, including The Flower Carrier, 1935, by Diego Rivera, establishes the nucleus of the permanent collection. Morley and her tiny professional staff present 70 exhibitions for over 150,000 visitors by the end of the year. 1936 The second year begins with an exhibition of works by Henri Matisse, primarily drawn from two local private collections. Many of the featured paintings and sculpture are later donated to the Museum, forming the core of an exceptional Fauve collection. The Museum becomes one of the first to recognize photography as a fine art by establishing, under the guidance of Curator John Humphrey, a collection of photographic works. 1937 The Museum presents a landmark showing of the work of Paul Cézanne, drawing over 30,000 visitors in its five-week run. The Museum hosts the only presentations outside New York of Fantastic Art, Dada, and Surrealism, organized by Alfred Barr, director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. 1940 The Museum makes national news when, at the closing hour on the last day of a major Picasso retrospective organized by New York’s Museum of Modern Art, 1,300 visitors sit down and refuse to leave “till they had had their fill.” The Museum organizes its first architecture exhibition Telesis: Space for Living, a landmark effort that prompts the city of San Francisco to establish an office of planning. 1941 The Museum presents Arshile Gorky’s first solo museum exhibition. 1945 As representatives of Allied countries meet in the Veterans Building to discuss the formation of the United Nations, the galleries are occupied by conference delegates and the press. From March through July, the Museum occupies a temporary facility off Union Square. The Museum presents Jackson Pollock’s first solo museum exhibition. Pollock’s early masterpiece Guardians of the Secret, 1943, is added to the collection. 1946 Two new Museum programs, Art in Cinema and the Rental Gallery—the latter being the first of its kind in the country—enhance Museum activities. 1950 The Museum enters the new decade sporting refurbished galleries, new classrooms, auditorium facilities in the sculpture court and an enlarged bookstore. 1952 Sixty-eight photographic works spanning Alfred Stieglitz’s entire career are acquired by purchase and through the gift of Georgia O’Keeffe. 1958 Morley steps down from her 23-year directorship and is succeeded by George D. Culler. 1963 The photography collection gains great depth with the addition of the Henry Swift Collection, a group of 85 prints by original members of f/64, including Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham and Edward Weston. 1964 A group of seven major paintings, including Picasso’s Les Femmes d’Alger (Women of Algiers), 1955, and La Chemise noire (The Black Chemise), ca. 1905–9, by Kees van Dongen, are donated to the collection by Wilbur D. May. 1966 Gerald Nordland assumes directorship of the Museum. 1970 The Museum launches an expansion program when the third floor of the Veterans Building is made available for operational space. 1972 The two-year, million-dollar renovation project is completed, adding new and refurbished fourth-floor galleries; a café; a fully equipped art conservation laboratory; expanded bookstore, offices and classrooms; and a new library on the third floor. 1974 Henry T. Hopkins arrives from the Fort Worth Art Museum to take over as director after Nordland’s departure in 1972. 1975 “Modern” is added to the Museum’s title to more accurately reflect its purview. SFMOMA expands its gallery space to the third floor. Artist Clyfford Still’s gift of 28 monumental paintings enriches the permanent collection. 1978 Curator John Humphrey ends his 43-year tenure at the Museum. 1979 Van Deren Coke is appointed director of photography. 1980 The Department of Photography is established. The Museum organizes and opens a major retrospective of Philip Guston to critical acclaim. 1983 The Department of Architecture and Design is established. 1985 The Museum commemorates its 50th anniversary with yearlong festivities, including a major exhibition of its permanent collection and a Museum-wide birthday party. 1987 John R. Lane becomes the fifth director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Sandra S. Phillips and Paolo Polledri are named curator of photography and curator of architecture and design, respectively. 1988 John Caldwell is appointed the first curator of painting and sculpture. The Department of Media Arts is established, and Robert R. Riley is appointed its founding curator. The Third Street site for the Museum’s new facility is announced. Swiss architect Mario Botta is selected to design the new building. 1989 SFMOMA’s four-part series celebrating the 150th anniversary of the invention of photography is launched with A History of Photography from California Collections, representing Sandra S. Phillips’s first major curatorial effort at SFMOMA. The series of exhibitions also includes Real Fictions: Recent Color Photographs by Bill Dane, John Harding and Larry Sultan; Experimental Color Photography; and John Gutmann: Beyond the Document. Georges Braque’s early example of Analytic Cubism, Violin and Candlestick, 1910, is bequeathed to the Museum by the Schreiber family. 1990 Organized by Curator Robert R. Riley, the Department of Media Arts’ first major exhibition, Bay Area Media, highlights the achievements of 10 artists who pioneered a variety of media art forms distinctive to the San Francisco Bay Area. SFMOMA presents Visionary San Francisco, a sweeping examination of the architectural planning of San Francisco—past, present and future—and the first major exhibition organized by the Department of Architecture and Design under the direction of Paolo Polledri. Mario Botta’s designs for the new building are unveiled. Phase I of the New Museum Campaign is completed with pledges of $65 million. The Elise S. Haas Collection is bequeathed to the Museum and includes Matisse’s seminal work Femme au chapeau (Woman with the Hat), 1905. Sigmar Polke, the first major exhibition of this contemporary German artist’s work, opens to international acclaim. The exhibition was organized by Curator of Painting and Sculpture John Caldwell. 1991 Mario Botta reveals design refinements for the new building in which the trees are removed from the crown. A major retrospective of the work of American artist Helen Levitt, organized by Curator of Photography Sandra S. Phillips, opens its national tour at SFMOMA. 1992 SFMOMA breaks ground for its new building with a two-day celebration that features performances by San Francisco artists Survival Research Laboratories and David Ireland. Phase II of the New Museum Campaign is completed with an additional $15 million in pledges, bringing the campaign total to $80 million. Phase III of the New Museum Campaign is launched. The Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson Collection—comprising seven works related to American Pop art—becomes the first major gift of art in honor of the new building. SFMOMA presents Jeff Koons, the first solo museum presentation of this controversial American artist’s work organized by Curator of Painting and Sculpture John Caldwell. 1993 Curator of Painting and Sculpture John Caldwell dies unexpectedly in March. The John Caldwell Memorial Fund is established. Gifts from donors, including works by such artists as Luciano Fabro, On Kawara, Jeff Koons and Sigmar Polke, are presented to the Museum in tribute to Caldwell. The topping-out phase of construction for the Museum’s new building is completed. John S. Weber is appointed Leanne and George Roberts Curator of Education and Public Programs. Gary Garrels is named Elise S. Haas Chief Curator and curator of painting and sculpture. 1994 Construction of the new building is completed. Staff offices and the permanent collection are moved to the new building. SFMOMA’s facility at 401 Van Ness Avenue is closed to the public on September 5. The SFMOMA MuseumStore opens at the new building in mid-October, prior to the holiday shopping season. Caffè Museo opens in mid-November. Aaron Betsky joins the Museum as curator of architecture and design. 1995 On January 18, SFMOMA celebrates its 60th anniversary with a public grand opening of the new Museum facility, which was attended by over 10,000 people. SFMOMA launches its Web site at www.sfmoma.org. 1996 On January 18, SFMOMA celebrates its first anniversary in the new building with the installation of the permanent, glass-etched donor wall and a public birthday party featuring a poster signing by Wayne Thiebaud and SFMOMA-inspired cakes. As of this milestone, SFMOMA has welcomed 800,000 visitors to the new Museum, and the Museum’s membership has grown to 35,000. 1997 On March 13, SFMOMA launches its first multimedia publication on CD-ROM, Voices and Images of California Art, which garners multiple awards. In September, the Museum introduces an accompanying Voices and Images Teacher Training Program and 100-page Classroom Curriculum Guide, which is employed by teachers throughout the state of California. In December, SFMOMA receives an unprecedented fractional gift of 250 works from Bay Area residents Vicki and Kent Logan, who have amassed one of the most exciting and important collections of contemporary art being formed in the United States today. 1998 On June 1, David A. Ross is appointed the sixth director of the Museum, replacing John R. Lane, who departed the previous year. Ross previously served as director of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. An unprecedented year of collecting: SFMOMA acquires 14 important Robert Rauschenberg works directly from the artist with the help of funds from Phyllis Wattis. Wattis’s support extends to the Museum’s purchase of René Magritte’s signature painting Les Valeurs personnelles (Personal Values), 1952, at auction. Other acquisitions include works by Piet Mondrian (the Museum’s first), Pablo Picasso, Anselm Kiefer, Brice Marden, Andy Warhol and Louise Bourgeois, among others. On view from September 4 to December 3, the exhibition Alexander Calder brings a record 300,000 visitors to SFMOMA, becoming the sixth most attended exhibition in the nation in 1998. 1999 The Photography Department receives over 1,000 images spanning the full history of the medium from the Prentice and Paul Sack Photographic Trust, as well as 11 rare works by American precisionist photographer Charles Sheeler. Continuing its aggressive collections-growth strategy, SFMOMA acquires 22 Ellsworth Kelly works from the artist’s personal collection. In September, Douglas R. Nickel is promoted from associate curator to curator of photography. Sandra S. Phillips’s position is enhanced to senior curator of photography. In honor of Phyllis Wattis, Robert Rauschenberg donates his monumental work Hiccups, 1978, which consists of 97 linked tranfer drawings on sheets of handmade paper. Wattis also enables the Museum to acquire key pieces by Eva Hesse and Brice Marden. 2000 In February, Benjamin Weil joins SFMOMA as curator of media arts. In April, Janet Bishop is promoted from associate curator of painting and sculpture to curator of painting and sculpture. In July, director David A. Ross announces the appointment of Madeleine Grynsztejn as SFMOMA’s Elise S. Haas Senior Curator of Painting and Sculpture. In October, SFMOMA presents Celebrating Modern Art: The Anderson Collection. Filling three floors of the Museum with over 300 works from the private collection of Bay Area collectors Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson, it is the largest exhibition in SFMOMA’s 65-year history. In December, SFMOMA becomes one of the leading repositories of the work of Sol LeWitt with a major acquisition of nine important wall drawings and structures and 26 working drawings, many of which are donated from the artist’s personal collection. The group of acquired works represents all the significant periods of LeWitt’s oeuvre. 2001 SFMOMA ventures beyond its galleries with two groundbreaking exhibitions. In addition to its major in-gallery presentation, 010101: Art in Technological Times—an exhibition charting global developments in contemporary art as artists respond to a world transformed by technology—launches a major online component at one minute after midnight on January 1. The site, www.sfmoma.org/010101, features five cutting-edge Web commissions as well as interactive public programs and resources. In May, Revelatory Landscapes brings site-specific installations by five teams of California-based landscape architects to locations around the Bay Area, making it SFMOMA’s first off-site exhibition. In July, SFMOMA marks the centennial of Ansel Adams’s birth with a full-fledged aesthetic reappraisal of Adams as an artist and working photographer. Ansel Adams at 100 brings together 114 of Adams’s finest photographs, representing exemplary prints drawn from important public and private collections of Adams’s work. In late 2001 and early 2002, the Museum receives seven major works by Frank Stella from the collection of Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson—including the seminal Black Painting Zambezi, 1959—establishing SFMOMA as a major repository of this important postwar artist’s work. The artist responds by gifting a new work from his series The Duel to SFMOMA in honor of the Andersons. 2002 In January, Joseph Rosa joins the Museum as the Helen Hilton Raiser Curator of Architecture and Design, the first person to hold this newly endowed post. On February 2, SFMOMA opens the historic retrospective Eva Hesse to glowing national reviews. Organized for the Museum by Elisabeth Sussman, SFMOMA is the sole U.S. venue for the exhibition, which will travel to Museum Wiesbaden, Germany, and the Tate Modern, London. On March 13, Neal Benezra is appointed director of SFMOMA, replacing David A. Ross, who departed in August 2001. Benezra was formerly deputy director and Frances and Thomas Dittmer Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at The Art Institute of Chicago. 2003 In January SFMOMA presents Treasures of Modern Art: The Legacy of Phyllis Wattis. This special exhibition highlights artworks acquired through the vision and generosity of devoted Trustee and patron Phyllis Wattis, who passed away in 2002. It features more than 80 of her most important gifts, including pieces by Robert Rauschenberg, Piet Mondrian, René Magritte, Marcel Duchamp, Andy Warhol, and Barnett Newman. In July the exhibition Marc Chagall opens to a record-breaking number of visitors: more than 4,000 per day. SFMOMA is the sole venue outside Paris for this major retrospective. In October SFMOMA Senior Curator of Photography Sandra Phillips and guest curator Elisabeth Sussman organize Diane Arbus Revelations, another popular and critically acclaimed retrospective that continues on to a three-year international tour. The Museum’s Koret Visitor Education Center, the only educational facility at an American art museum to offer drop-in public access, celebrates its first anniversary. 2004 In yet another banner year, SFMOMA welcomes nearly 800,000 visitors and experiences a 36 percent increase in membership, giving it the largest member base of any modern or contemporary art museum in the country. In July the fifth floor becomes home to the ongoing exhibition Between Art and Life: The Contemporary Painting and Sculpture Collection, presenting SFMOMA’s significant collection of post-1960 contemporary art. The entire second floor is devoted to the display of the Museum’s formidable collection of modern art (1900–1960). This new installation scheme allots more than 50 percent of the institution’s total gallery space to its remarkable holdings in painting and sculpture. Among the nearly 600 works acquired in 2004, of particular note are Suspension of Disbelief (for Marine) (1991–92), a video installation by Gary Hill; Tide Table (2003), a film and suite of related drawings by the South African artist William Kentridge; and Atrabiliarios (1992–2004), a mixed-media installation by the Columbian artist Doris Salcedo. 2005 January 18 marks the tenth anniversary of the Museum’s new building, now a San Francisco landmark, designed by the renowned Swiss architect Mario Botta. In March the Museum announces the promised gift of nearly 800 photographs to the Prentice and Paul Sack Photographic Trust at SFMOMA from the Sacks’ private collection. These important pictures augment the couple’s 1998 gift of nearly 1,000 works spanning the history of the medium. All of the photographs will also be made available to the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (when the de Young Museum reopens in October 2005, it will house a new gallery specifically devoted to photography). In May SFMOMA inaugurates the Modern Ball, a spring fundraising gala to be held biennially, with immense success. Attendees dine, dance, and mingle while raising nearly $2 million to support the Museum’s exhibitions and programs. In July SFMOMA presents The Art of Richard Tuttle, the first full-scale retrospective of Tuttle’s work, which spans his four-decade career and features more than three hundred objects.
Website Link to Organization's History / Organization Overview: 
http://www.sfmoma.org/info/mushist_timeline.asp
Website Link to Exhibition / Programming / Publishing History: 
http://www.sfmoma.org/info/mushist_timeline.asp
Part 3.
3a. Names and email addresses of Founders, Board Members, Directors or other key individuals:: 
Grace McCann Morley (1st director - deceased)
Additional Names and email addresses of Founders, Board Members, Directors or other key individuals: 
Neal Benezra (current director)
3b. Could any of these individuals assist in providing an oral history of your organization?: 
Unknown
Part 4.
4a. Is organization currently active?: 
Yes
4b. Year activity suspended if no longer active.: 
Organization Still Active
Part 5.
5a. Type of organization at its founding.: 
Non-Profit [IRS certified]
5b. Type of organization currently, or at the termination of activities.: 
Non-Profit [IRS certified]
Part 6.
6a. Does the organization have an archive?: 
Yes
6b. Are there any short or long-term threats to the organization?: 
None / Not Applicable
6c. Other threats to the organization:: 
Are there other threats to your organization? Please describe below.
Part 7.
survey_field_130: 
several - fiscal, lack of and dreain on staff, space
7a. How important is to the organization to preserve the organization’s historical material. From 1 – Very Important to 5 – Not Important.: 
1. Very Important
7b. Has planning for the preservation and documentation of archive begun?: 
Yes
7c. Does the organization know how and where to seek expertise and assistance?: 
Yes
7d. Does the organization have specific concerns regarding starting an archive working with its historic materials?: 
Other Concerns - Please describe below.
Part 8.
8a. Is the organization's archives in the collection of another institution or promised to one?: 
No
8a. Location: 
IF YES to 8: University (Name)
8b. Archival materials are also located at:: 
Unknown
Where are these locations?: 
Where are these locations? [I.E. Home / Office of Private Individual(s) (i.e. Former Board, Staff, Funders, etc)]
Part 9.
9. Does the organization maintain archives for any other organization.: 
No
survey_field_49: 
IF YES to 9: 10a. Please describe:
Part 10a.
10a. Is the archive accessible to scholars, curators or researchers?: 
Yes
Part 10b.
10b. Are there conditions of access for scholars, curators or researchers?: 
Yes
Part 10c.
10c. How are arrangements made for access to archive?: 
Interested researchers must contact the Head Librarian and describe their research topic. The Archives are currently unprocessed so access is severly restricted. If the project merits access, if the Head has the staff, and if the records of interest are reletively easily accessed then arrangements can be made. If the question is a brief and fairly simple one that the Head can answer, then every effort is made to do so.
Part 10d.
10d. Would you allow access in the future?: 
Yes
Part 10e.
10e. Under what circumstances would access to archives be allowed.: 
Interested researchers must contact the Head Librarian and describe their research topic. The Archives are currently unprocessed so access is severly restricted. If the project merits access, if the Head has the staff, and if the records of interest are reletively easily accessed then arrangements can be made. If the question is a brief and fairly simple one that the Head can answer, then every effort is made to do so.
Part 11.
The following questions address the historical materials (type, quantity and storage) of the organization. 11a. Paper Files and Documents: 
Artist Files
Correspondence
Board Minutes
Exhibition or Production Files
Financial Records
Legal Documents
By-laws / Incorporation Documents
Other Paper Files
11b. Artwork and Documentation: 
Audiotapes [Any Format]
Oral History, Recordings and / or Transcripts
Other Audio Recordings (i.e. records, etc.)
CDs / DVDs [Pre-Recorded or CD-R / CD-RW / DVD-R / etc.]
Other Digital Materials
Films
Slides
Microfiche
Photographs
Videotapes
Unique Art Objects
Other:: 
Other Artwork
11c. Press and Promotional Materials: 
Announcements, Mailing Cards, etc.
Newspaper / Magazine / Media Clippings
Posters / Flyers
Other Press or Promotional Materials - Please describe below.
Other:: 
banners
11d. Printed Publications: 
Artists' Publications
Brochures
Broadsides / Small Press
Commercially Published Materials
Checklists / Performance Programs / Price Lists
Programs of Events
Other:: 
Other Printed Publications
11e. Other: 
Architectural Drawings / Floor Plan
Layouts / Sketches / Instructions for Installations
Mock-Ups / Models / Prototypes
Other:: 
Other
Part 12.
12. What years does the materials cover?: 
1950-1959
1960-1969
1970-1979
1980-1989
1990-1999
2000-2005
Part 13.
13a. How is the material stored?: 
Banker Boxes
Other Boxes
File Cabinets
Three-Ring Binders
13b. Are some or all of these storage units “archival”?: 
None
Part 14.
14a. Estimated Number of Boxes or Milk-Crate Sized Storage Units: 
200 +
14b. Estimated Number of Archive Drawers: 
41 - 50
14c. Estimated Number of Archive Notebooks: 
----
14d. Estimated the total Linear Feet. ["Linear Feet" is standard measure of the quantity of archival materials on the basis of shelf space occupied or the length of drawers in vertical files or the thickness of horizontally filed materials. For example, a: 
200 +
Part 15.
15. Is the historical materials - or archives - inventoried or catalogued in any way, either formally or otherwise?: 
Yes
Part 16 / Electronic Files & Archival Management
16g. Who is responsible for working with the archival material?: 
Other - Please describe below.
Please describe: 
Head Librarian
Part 17.
17. How are new materials processed?: 
No System
We are not currently processing new material
Other - Please describe below.
Other: 
Archives is currently unprocessed.
Part 18.
18. What, if any, conservation methods are in place for both physical materials and electronic data?: 
Controlled Access
Disaster Plan
Fireproof Building / Fireproof Room
Part 19.
19. What type of climate-controls are present in the area[s] in which the archives are stored?: 
No or minimal climate controls [i.e. in an attic, basement, unheated / uncooled storage area, etc.]
Part 20.
20a. What are the goals for the historical materials for the next year?: 
establish archives
20b. What are the biggest challenges to reaching these short-term goals?: 
funding
20c. What goals are in place for the historical materials for the next three to five years?: 
hire permanent staff
20d. What are the biggest challenges to reaching these long term goals?: 
funding
20e. Are there any additional goals for the organizations historic materials?: 
establish oral history program to compliment archives
Part 21.
21. Estimated cost to achieve these archival goals for the next year.: 
$150,001 - $200,000
Part 22.
22. Estimated cost to achieve these archival goals for the next five years.: 
$250,001 +
Part 24.
24. What archival issues could / should visual arts organizations address collectively in the next three to five years? Ranked from 1 (highest priority) to 5 (lowest priority).24a. Shared standards / protocols for digitization: 
Promote professional standards / protocols for digitization
Part 25.
25a. Is the organization a member of, or in contact with, any organizations concerned with archival issues?: 
Yes
25b. Who?: 
SAA - Society of American Archivists ROHO - Regional Oral History Office, Bancroft, UC Berkeley HAI - History Associates Incorporated BAVC - Bay Area Video Coalition Chicago Albumen Works
Finish
survey_field_149: 
I wish to defer payment and allow AS-AP to use these funds to further AS-AP’s efforts to preserve the history of the alternative and avant-garde movement in America.