AS-AP

Survey: Invisible Venue

Posted August 05, 2010 by Anonymous
Organization: 
Part 1.
Year Founded: 
2005
1b. Primary activity[ies] of the organization.: 
Invisible Venue collaborates with artists to present art in unexpected settings.
1c. Organization's annual budget.: 
$0 - $50,000
1b. Primary activity[ies] of the organization.: 
Presenting Organization
Transient or Non-Physical Organization for Creation or Exhibitions
Transient Organization for Performance
Part 2.
2a. Mission Statement: 
Invisible Venue collaborates with artists to present art in unexpected settings. It is a one-person organization, founded and directed by Christian L. Frock since 2005, that supports artist’s ideas and explores alternative locations for the presentation of contemporary art, outside of conventional gallery and institutional settings. Since its inception, Invisible Venue has collaborated with more than 30 artists to present projects in a variety of unconventional spaces. Projects have included digital media online and on the telephone, guerilla billboard interventions, ephemeral performance, site-specific temporary installations, public events, happenings, and accidental encounters. In 2008, Invisible Venue was a recipient of an Alternative Exposure Grant, awarded by San Francisco non-profit artist space Southern Exposure in conjunction with The Andy Warhol Foundation to support independent initiatives in contemporary art—other wise, it is a largely self-funded, DIY endeavor. Complete documentation of each project and details about participating artists are available on www.invisiblevenue.com.
Website Link to Mission Statement: 
www.invisiblevenue.com
2b. Organization History / Organizational Overview. Index of important events in organization's history.: 
Invisible Venue originated in 2005 as a website to present new media projects online. The first project, titled "You Don’t Know San Francisco," featured eleven videos by Bay Area artists. Inspired by public artworks that engage domestic spaces, Invisible Venue commissioned eleven projects for presentation in a four bedroom Victorian in West Oakland from 2007 - 2009. All of the commissioned work investigated the inherent politics of the location as a public platform—in every instance, the space itself was intrinsic to the ideas. Investigations included the physical building and its architecture, but also macro-level considerations of the past and present politics of the neighborhood, the historical and social concerns of Oakland, the location in the vicinity of an important industrial port, and the micro-level considerations of the space as both public and domestic, interior and exterior. In 2008 Invisible Venue won an Alternative Exposure Grant, awarded by San Francisco nonprofit Southern Exposure in conjunction with The Andy Warhol Foundation, to support independent initiatives in contemporary art. In addition to a vote of confidence, this grant provided small budgets for 11 projects during 2008 - 2009; otherwise Invisible Venue operates as a do-it-yourself venture, with all of the self-directed autonomy and limited financial means implied therein. Since its inception Invisible Venue has collaborated with more than 30 artists to present projects in a variety of unconventional spaces. Projects have included digital media online and on the telephone, guerilla billboard interventions, ephemeral performance, site-specific temporary installations, public events, happenings, and accidental encounters. Since relinquishing the West Oakland space in August of 2009, Invisible Venue has transformed again to produce projects in exclusively public environments. Recent projects include Chris Basmajian’s Moment Magnitude (2009), a site-specific guerilla video projection at the site of the West Oakland freeway collapse during the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake and Silence, Please! (2010) by Chris Kubick, an intervention and site-specific installation in the Oakland History Room in the Main Public Library. "Hello! My name is..." (2010) was a site-specific intervention of artist-designed conference badges inserted into the College Art Associations 98th Annual Conference in Chicago, to accompany the presentation of a paper by Christian L. Frock which provided an overview of Invisible Venue’s history.
Website Link to Organization's History / Organization Overview: 
www.invisiblevenue.com
2c. Exhibition / Programming / Publishing History.: 
February 2010: "Hello! My Name is..." an intervention of artist-designed conference badges featuring contributions by Chris Basmajian, Michael Damm, Anthony Discenza, Charles Gute, Jamie Hilder, Scott Oliver, Susan O’Malley, Zachary Royer Scholz, Zefrey Throwell, Christine Wong Yap; CAA Conference, Chicago, IL February 2010: Frock, Christian L. "Invisible Venue(s): Alternatives to the Institution. Published in audio format by College Art Association, on the occasion of the 98th annual conference in Chicago, Illinois and presented in a session titled "Site Variations: The Shifting Grounds for Public Art," chaired by Dr. Harriet Senie and Dr. Cher Knight. January 2010: "Silence, Please!" an installation and performance by Chris Kubick, Oakland History Room, Main Public Library, Oakland, CA December 2009: "Public Art Survey," a Passive/Aggressive Intervention selected by artist, historian and urban strategist Jeanne Przyblyski and presented in collaboration with Southern Exposure, San Francisco, CA October 2009: "(Meant to be) Lost and Found" displaced correspondence as public art featuring Anthony Discenza, Charles Gute, Jonn Herschend, and Jamie Hilder; Various public spaces New York and Brooklyn, NY October 2009: "Moment Magnitude" a site-specific guerilla video projection by Chris Basmajian, Oakland, CA April 2009: "Order and Ornamentation" a site-specific installation and public intervention by Christine Lee, Oakland, CA February 2009: "Democracy is Best Taught by Example Not By War" a limited edition mail art project by Aaron Stienstra, Oakland, CA December 2008: "incidental films for an accidental audience" a set of site-specific video projections by Michael Damm, Oakland, CA October 2008: "Territories" a site-specific installation and sculpture by Alex Clausen, Oakland, CA June 2008: "99 cent Bubble" a site-specific installation by Kimberlee Koym-Murteira, Oakland, CA March 2008: "Hub" a site-specific installation and performance by Victoria May, Oakland, CA November 2007: "The Man Who Disappeared Into His Own Clothes Pile" a site-specific fiction by Jonn Herschend, Oakland, CA September 2007: "Democracy is Best Taught By Example Not By War" a billboard intervention by Aaron Stienstra, Oakland, CA July 2007: "Untitled (Missed Connection for West Oakland)" a site-specific installation by Andrew Austin Reilly, Oakland, CA July 2007: "Hey Cupcake" a site-specific installation by Susan O’Malley, Oakland, CA June 2007: "Will You Marry Me?" a billboard intervention by Steve Lambert October 2006: "The HUO Drawings" a web-based exhibition by Charles Gute, www.invisiblevenue.com October 2005: "You Don’t Know San Francisco" a web-based exhibition of videos by Bay Area artists Tommy Becker, Nathan Burazer, Yin-Ju Chen, Catherine Czacki, Melissa Day, Anthony Discenza, RL Jablo, Skyler Thomas, Tim Sullivan, Sieglinde Van Damme, and Heidi Zumbrun; www.invisiblevenue.com with a public screening event in London, UK and Oakland, CA
Website Link to Exhibition / Programming / Publishing History: 
www.invisiblevenue.com
Part 3.
3a. Names and email addresses of Founders, Board Members, Directors or other key individuals:: 
Christian L. Frock christian@invisiblevenue.com
3b. Could any of these individuals assist in providing an oral history of your organization?: 
Yes
Part 4.
4a. Is organization currently active?: 
Yes
4b. Year activity suspended if no longer active.: 
Organization Still Active
Part 5.
5a. Type of organization at its founding.: 
Collective / Unincorporated Association
5b. Type of organization currently, or at the termination of activities.: 
Collective / Unincorporated Association
Part 6.
6a. Does the organization have an archive?: 
Yes
6b. Are there any short or long-term threats to the organization?: 
None / Not Applicable
6c. Other threats to the organization:: 
Are there other threats to your organization? Please describe below.
Part 7.
7a. How important is to the organization to preserve the organization’s historical material. From 1 – Very Important to 5 – Not Important.: 
1. Very Important
7b. Has planning for the preservation and documentation of archive begun?: 
Our archive is already in place
7c. Does the organization know how and where to seek expertise and assistance?: 
Not Applicable
7d. Does the organization have specific concerns regarding starting an archive working with its historic materials?: 
Space Concerns
Part 8.
8a. Is the organization's archives in the collection of another institution or promised to one?: 
No
8a. Location: 
IF YES to 8: University (Name)
8b. Archival materials are also located at:: 
No
Where are these locations?: 
Where are these locations? [I.E. Home / Office of Private Individual(s) (i.e. Former Board, Staff, Funders, etc)]
Part 9.
9. Does the organization maintain archives for any other organization.: 
No
survey_field_49: 
IF YES to 9: 10a. Please describe:
Part 10a.
10a. Is the archive accessible to scholars, curators or researchers?: 
Yes
Part 10b.
10b. Are there conditions of access for scholars, curators or researchers?: 
No
Part 11.
The following questions address the historical materials (type, quantity and storage) of the organization. 11a. Paper Files and Documents: 
Correspondence
Exhibition or Production Files
Other Paper Files
11b. Artwork and Documentation: 
Audiotapes [Any Format]
Photographs
Unique Art Objects
Other:: 
Other Artwork
11c. Press and Promotional Materials: 
Announcements, Mailing Cards, etc.
Newspaper / Magazine / Media Clippings
Other Press or Promotional Materials - Please describe below.
Other:: 
Publications
11d. Printed Publications: 
Artists' Publications
Brochures
Checklists / Performance Programs / Price Lists
Other:: 
Other Printed Publications
Other:: 
Other
Part 12.
12. What years does the materials cover?: 
2000-2005
2006-2009
Part 13.
13a. How is the material stored?: 
File Cabinets
Three-Ring Binders
Other - Please describe below.
Please describe: 
Internet/website
13b. Are some or all of these storage units “archival”?: 
None
Part 14.
14a. Estimated Number of Boxes or Milk-Crate Sized Storage Units: 
1 - 10
14b. Estimated Number of Archive Drawers: 
1 - 10
14c. Estimated Number of Archive Notebooks: 
1 - 10
14d. Estimated the total Linear Feet. ["Linear Feet" is standard measure of the quantity of archival materials on the basis of shelf space occupied or the length of drawers in vertical files or the thickness of horizontally filed materials. For example, a: 
1 - 10
Other Archive Storage Units - Please describe below.: 
Website
Part 15.
15. Is the historical materials - or archives - inventoried or catalogued in any way, either formally or otherwise?: 
No
Part 16.
16a. Is there a key, index or finding aid to the materials inventoried?: 
No
16b. Paper-based:: 
Not Applicable
16c. Electronic Based:: 
Other
Other: 
Website
Part 16 / Electronic Files & Archival Management
16f. Does the organization have a back-up program, or back-up schedule, for its electronic records and perform monitoring of its removable media (i.e. floppies, ZIP disks, CD-ROMs, DVDs, portable hard drives, etc.)?: 
Yes
16g. Who is responsible for working with the archival material?: 
Other - Please describe below.
Please describe: 
This is a one-person organization.
Part 17.
17. How are new materials processed?: 
No System
Part 18.
18. What, if any, conservation methods are in place for both physical materials and electronic data?: 
None or Limited
Part 19.
19. What type of climate-controls are present in the area[s] in which the archives are stored?: 
No or minimal climate controls [i.e. in an attic, basement, unheated / uncooled storage area, etc.]
Part 20.
20a. What are the goals for the historical materials for the next year?: 
1.
20b. What are the biggest challenges to reaching these short-term goals?: 
1.
20c. What goals are in place for the historical materials for the next three to five years?: 
Collation into a publication
20d. What are the biggest challenges to reaching these long term goals?: 
Finanial support
20e. Are there any additional goals for the organizations historic materials?: 
Ongoing web-documentation
Part 21.
21. Estimated cost to achieve these archival goals for the next year.: 
$4,000 - $5,000
Part 22.
22. Estimated cost to achieve these archival goals for the next five years.: 
$4,000 - $5,000
Part 24.
24. What archival issues could / should visual arts organizations address collectively in the next three to five years? Ranked from 1 (highest priority) to 5 (lowest priority).24a. Shared standards / protocols for digitization: 
Promote professional standards / protocols for digitization
Part 25.
25a. Is the organization a member of, or in contact with, any organizations concerned with archival issues?: 
No
Finish
survey_field_150: 
Christian L. Frock
Who executed this survey.: 
Christian L. Frock
Is this survey complete and all appropriate questions answered?: 
Yes