AS-AP

Survey: Chez Bushwick Studios

Posted August 05, 2010 by Anonymous
Organization: 
Part 1.
Year Founded: 
1999
1b. Primary activity[ies] of the organization.: 
Interdisciplinary Performance Space
1c. Organization's annual budget.: 
$0 - $50,000
1b. Primary activity[ies] of the organization.: 
Multipurpose Space [Amalgam of Multiple Artistic Disciplines]
Part 2.
2a. Mission Statement: 
Chez Bushwick is committed to providing outstanding resources to performing artists, fostering the development, research, and presentation of new work. Since its inception in 2002, the arts center stands as an exemplary model of economic and financial sustainability, while also demonstrating a rare social conscience for the health of its surrounding civic neighborhoods, often partnering with local Bushwick artists to facilitate community outreach activities in neighboring public institutions. While rehearsal space is rented to artists at the incomparable rate of $5 dollars an hour, Chez Bushwick also collaborates intimately with its constituents over a sustained period of time, in order to best accommodate their creative development. The acquisition of storage space, library resources, studio showings (with an emphasis on cooperative feedback), community dinners, theoretical discourses, relief benefits, fundraising parties, artist in residence programs, and evening length presentations are all to integral to Chez Bushwick’s holistic and supportive approach to serving the contemporary performing artist. The organization was a 2009-2010 recipient of the Rockefeller Cultural Innovation Fund Award for the community project CAPITAL B.
Website Link to Mission Statement: 
http://dtw.org/os_recp_05.cfm
2b. Organization History / Organizational Overview. Index of important events in organization's history.: 
Organization History: Chez Bushwick is located in the geographical and cultural heart of Bushwick, bordering "East Williamsburg Industrial Park" in Northern Brooklyn. Located at 304 Boerum Street, the 2,600’ foot arts center was formerly an industrial knitting factory, prior to its purchase in 1999 by Rob Herschenfeld Design Incorporated. A graduate of the MIT School of Design, Herschenfeld hand­renovated the entire building, garnering international acclaim in Architectural Digest and DETAIL for his exquisite craftsmanship and attention to spatial reasoning. All designs are custom­rendered on the premises of the building, through unionized local labor and environmentally­conscious materials. The studio dimensions measure 48’ feet in length by 30’ feet in width, with the perimeter of the studio surrounded by hand­made, insulated windows ensuring unparalleled access to North­Eastern natural light. As a result, the rehearsal space offers performing and visual artists easy access to photo­ shoots and video documentation of excellent caliber. Unique for its expansive, open layout, Chez Bushwick’s designers consciously avoided pillars or other studio obstructions, allowing ceiling­high chrome doors to join the rehearsal space with adjoining areas. In addition to the 1,400’ feet of studio space, Chez Bushwick also includes 300’ feet of overhead storage, a fully equipped kitchen with modern appliances, a studio restroom with archival performance publications, an additional restroom with shower amenities, a small waiting area for stretching and congregation, and three office spaces for administrative work. The construction of a dual­entry system has also eased the flow of traffic; in addition to a front entrance, a more direct studio entrance is also offered, facilitating easy access to the industrial­size freight elevator. This provides dexterity for artists while loading­in or striking their materials, props and set designs. A lighting grid has also been installed, as well as improved electrical sockets and voltage, all of which optimize the performance facilities for artists. Not only is Chez Bushwick conveniently located 1 block from the Morgan Avenue L Train Station, allowing easy access to transportation, but the arts center is also situated 2 blocks from a Natural Foods Market, a Coffee Shop, an Organic Cafe, and a Video Store (all designed by Herschenfeld), each improving the quality of life in the surrounding civic area. Mutually beneficial relationships with local businesses are encouraged by the studio’s rental activity. Chez Bushwick’s proximity to the L Train allows for a 15 minute journey from Manhattan, which has attracted artists from Chelsea, the East and West Villages, and Williamsburg; its subsequent access to the G Train has also encouraged renters from Greenpoint, and Downtown Brooklyn; a ten minute walk from the J, M and Z Trains has availed transportation from the Lower East Side, Jamaica, and Canarsie. The center is also a 12 minute drive from the Williamsburg Bridge by vehicle, and an even shorter distance from Queens. Stationed advantageously close to major airports JFK International and La Guardia, parking has recently become available as well.
Website Link to Organization's History / Organization Overview: 
http://dtw.org/os_recp_05.cfm
2c. Exhibition / Programming / Publishing History.: 
Exhibition/Programming/Publishing: Chez Bushwick remains independently operated by several artist executors, but does not maintain formal affiliations with a resident company or individual.* The specific intention is to meet the rehearsal needs of outer borough performing artists by offering high quality resources, and improving their quality of life. Priorities have always centered on accommodating the needs of its artist clientele. The studio is operational from 9am to 10pm, seven days each week, including all major national and religious holidays. Hours of operation are also designed to allow for flexibility, in the event that earlymorning classes or latenight rehearsals are requested. Emergency rentals have been accommodated in nearly every instance. On any given weekday, an average of 810 hours of studio space is reserved for rehearsals, classes, special functions, and media documentation. Studio showings may be arranged at the artist’s discretion, and Chez Bushwick administrators employ liberal measures to allow the renter full artistic freedom in arranging an event. Artists often choose to schedule rehearsal space, informal studio showings, and even a benefit concert, completing their research with a season of performances (reorganizing the space all the while, to best accommodate their work). While the space’s dimensions attract an artist clientele working for the proscenium aesthetics of prominent New York City venues (the measurements of the studio were intended to reflect the stages of Dance Theatre Workshop, The Kitchen, Danspace Project, and The BAM Harvey Theatre, among others), the intimate design also appeals to sitespecific events, performance installations, loft jams, and gallery exhibitions. Consequently, Chez Bushwick has earned a reputation for its agility in presenting experimental approaches to live performance, often donating space to organizations in need of resources. A recent example involved the offering of space to The Movement Research Festival 2004, in which acclaimed artist KoosilJa Hwang conceived of "a 24hour public sleep demonstration," involving 10 live performers, electroacoustic music, and 20 televisions streaming live imagery throughout the night. Just one week later, The Festival continued at Chez Bushwick with a solo by Douglas Dunn, specially commissioned for the occasion by the studio. These donations and commissions partially illustrate the Chez Bushwick’s ongoing interest in providing useful alternatives for artists in economic hardship. This agenda of service also resulted in a Tsunami Relief Benefit in early 2005, directly addressing the aftermath of international turmoil. The event was designed to raise funds for the relief effort in Southeast Asia. Additionally, the studio has an active artistinresidence program that commissions new work, while also implementing local community service projects: Bushwick artist Miguel Gutierrez enjoyed subsidized rehearsal space during his 2004 collaboration with local visual artist Christophe Draeger, culminating in a BessieAward winning production at The Kitchen; Mary Overlie (a neighboring Boerum St. resident) has also partnered with Chez Bushwick to utilize the studio for teaching movement studies to children at a neighboring public school; Emile Bokaer has accepted a position as a local librarian at the Bushwick branch of the Brooklyn Public Library; and Ain Gordon has begun the development of a new interdisciplinary project, collaborating with Bushwick youth on a sociohistorical event to be developed over the next two years. Hourly Space Rental 2004: (Itemized): January: 208 Rehearsal Hours 12 Studio Showing Hours 28 Performance Hours **262 Total Hours February: 197 Rehearsal Hours 18 Studio Showing Hours 36 Performance Hours 8 Class Hours **259 Total Hours March: 187 Rehearsal Hours 23 Studio Showing Hours 18 Performance Hours 12 Class Hours **240 Total Hours April: 209 Rehearsal Hours 19 Studio Showing Hours 23 Performance Hours 21 Class Hours **272 Total Hours May: 177 Rehearsal Hours 26 Studio Showing Hours 18 Performance Hours 16 Class Hours **237 Total Hours June: 196 Rehearsal Hours 17 Studio Showing Hours 37 Performance Hours 9 Class Hours **259 Total Hours July: 212 Rehearsal Hours 30 Studio Showing Hours 29 Performance Hours 14 Class Hours **285 Total Hours August: 189 Rehearsal Hours 21 Studio Showing Hours 32 Performance Hours 21 Class Hours **263 Total Hours September: 167 Rehearsal Hours 29 Studio Showing Hours 16 Performance Hours 13 Class Hours **225 Total Hours October: 196 Rehearsal Hours 31 Studio Showing Hours 36 Performance Hours 18 Class Hours **281 Total Hours November: 213 Rehearsal Hours 27 Studio Showing Hours 32 Performance Hours 21 Class Hours **293 Total Hours December: 221 Rehearsal Hours 24 Studio Showing Hours 42 Performance Hours 18 Class Hours **305 Total Hours Total Rental Hours 2004: ***3,181 SHTUDIO SHOW: Project Description – SHTUDIO SHOW SHTUDIO SHOW will take place in Chez Bushwick Studios, a 2600 foot performance loft situated in the geographical and cultural heart of Bushwick. Chez Bushwick Studios is located at 304 Boerum St., a former knitting factory that is privately owned by MIT Graduate Robert Herschenfeld, who has renovated the entire premises using local union labor, and architecturally green materials. SHTUDIO SHOW will occur on the second floor of the former factory, in the largest performance area in the building. SHTUDIO SHOW is Bushwick’s only regular performing arts showcase. The series is dedicated to representing the local activity of this part of Brooklyn, while also maintaining the New York avant-garde’s unique legacy of experimental counterculture and underground ooomph. The project occurs monthly, at 9pm on the third Saturday of each month, with a summer recess during June, July and August. The event is curated by Bessie-Award Winning Dance Artist Miguel Gutierrez, a Bushwick native and curatorial associate at The Kitchen. This incomparable showcase is truly interdisciplinary in nature, often incorporating dance, live art, film and video, electronic music, intervention in public space, and art installations. Gutierrez seeks to curate a program that juxtaposes older, established artists with fresh, unknown talent, while always representing a fair cross-section of the Bushwick area, and greater New York. Each SHTUDIO SHOW consists of four artists across disciplines, and one interview with a prominent cultural figure of the day. Additionally, each artist is given a small stipend for their evening’s performance, generated from the proceeds of the admission income. Photo, video and written documentation will also be integral to the event, and a monthly exhibition catalogue will be printed after each showcase. This forum is specifically targeted across generations and media, attracting a large audience of both loyal supporters and novices. The main appeal of the SHTUDIO SHOW is its resonance with local artist community of Bushwick; the monthly series resembles a neighborhood folk tradition, and is not to be missed. The associates of Chez Bushwick Studios are interested in cultivated strong ties with the surrounding community; this community has also mobilized in an anomalous way, pooling resources to subsidize its own rehearse space at the low rate of $5 an hour. Chez Bushwick remains independently operated by several artist executors, but does not maintain formal affiliations with a resident company or individual. The specific intention is to meet the rehearsal needs of outer-borough performing artists by offering high quality resources, and improving the quality of their creative processes. Priorities have always centered on accommodating the needs of its artist clientele. Hours of operation are also designed to allow for flexibility, in the event that early morning classes or late night rehearsals are requested. Emergency rentals have been accommodated in nearly every instance. On any given weekday, an average of 8-10 hours of studio space is reserved for rehearsals, classes, special functions, and media documentation. Studio showings may be arranged at the artist’s discretion, and Chez Bushwick administrators employ liberal measures to allow the renter full artistic freedom in arranging an event. Artists often choose to schedule rehearsal space, informal studio showings, and even benefits. The intimate design of the space also appeals to site-specific events, performance installations, loft jams, and art exhibitions. Consequently, Chez Bushwick has earned a reputation for its agility in presenting experimental approaches to live performance, often donating space to organizations in need of resources. A recent example involved an offer of space to The Movement Research Festival 2004, in which acclaimed artist Koosil-Ja Hwang conceived of "a 24-hour public sleep demonstration," involving 10 live performers, electro-acoustic music, and 20 televisions streaming live imagery throughout the night. May 2005: Jonah Bokaer - Dance & Technology Daniel Linehan - Dance Tere O’Connor - Dance Roxxxane - Intervention Jeremy Wade - Dance Technopia Interviews Vallejo Gantner, artistic director of PS 122 September 2005: Jennifer Cook - Dance Diane Cluck - Anti-Folk Ishmael Houston-Jones - Erotic Literature Reading Charlotte Gibbons and Geoffrey Nosach - Dance & Decor Technopia Interviews Beth Gill, dance artist October 2005: Marissa Perel and John Moniaci - music Meredith Glisson - dance John Jasperse – SCAVENGER Sean Meehan – music Technopia Interviews Gia Kourlas, dance critic of the NY Times November 2005: Michael Portnoy - performance peeesseye - music Eileen Myles - reads Jeremy Wade - dance Luciana Achugar - dance Technopia interviews Cathy Edwards, artistic director of Dance Theater Workshop December 2005: Loren Dempster - Solo Cello Magnetic Laboratorium - SX Street Performance Video Bushwick String Quartet Heather Kravas - Dance & Performance Technopia Interviews Carla Peterson, executive director of Movement Research January 2005: PARADIGM - Dance Retarded Abandon (Chase Granoff and Chris Peck) - Electronic Music DD Dorvillier/human future dance corps - Dance Maia Sage Ermansons - Dance Technopia interviews Deborah Hay, Dance Artist February 2005: Miguel Gutierrez - Dance Sam Kim - Dance Ryder - Video, Music & Performance Nancy Foreshaw-Clapp - Dance Technopia Interviews Tere O’Connor, Dance Artist March 2005: Antje Pfundtner Jilian Pena - Dance/Video DD Dorvillier, Jennifer Monson, Zeena Parkins - Dance & Music Talibam - Music Technopia Interviews Yasuko Yokoshi, Dance Artist
Website Link to Exhibition / Programming / Publishing History: 
http://dtw.org/os_recp_05.cfm
Part 3.
3a. Names and email addresses of Founders, Board Members, Directors or other key individuals:: 
Jonah Bokaer jonahb37@hotmail.com
Additional Names and email addresses of Founders, Board Members, Directors or other key individuals: 
Jeremy Wade globalhustle@hotmail.com
Additional Names and email addresses of Founders, Board Members, Directors or other key individuals: 
Loren Dempster kiyoshid@earthlink.net
Additional Names and email addresses of Founders, Board Members, Directors or other key individuals: 
Miguel Gutierrez miguelisatwork@yahoo.com
3b. Could any of these individuals assist in providing an oral history of your organization?: 
Yes
Part 4.
4a. Is organization currently active?: 
Yes
4b. Year activity suspended if no longer active.: 
Organization Still Active
Part 5.
5a. Type of organization at its founding.: 
Collective / Unincorporated Association
5b. Type of organization currently, or at the termination of activities.: 
Collective / Unincorporated Association
Part 6.
6a. Does the organization have an archive?: 
Yes
6b. Are there any short or long-term threats to the organization?: 
Fiscal endangerment of organization
End of lease for your space resulting in a move to a smaller location
End of lease for your space resulting in termination of activities or changing of priorities
Changes in your physical space that will result in endangerment to your archival materials
6c. Other threats to the organization:: 
See Above. We are on a commercial lease, renewed yearly, and we’re waiting/fundraising to buy.
Part 7.
7a. How important is to the organization to preserve the organization’s historical material. From 1 – Very Important to 5 – Not Important.: 
1. Very Important
7b. Has planning for the preservation and documentation of archive begun?: 
Yes
7c. Does the organization know how and where to seek expertise and assistance?: 
Yes
7d. Does the organization have specific concerns regarding starting an archive working with its historic materials?: 
Lack of Staff
Part 8.
8a. Is the organization's archives in the collection of another institution or promised to one?: 
No
8a. Location: 
IF YES to 8: University (Name)
8b. Archival materials are also located at:: 
No
Where are these locations?: 
Where are these locations? [I.E. Home / Office of Private Individual(s) (i.e. Former Board, Staff, Funders, etc)]
Part 9.
9. Does the organization maintain archives for any other organization.: 
No
survey_field_49: 
IF YES to 9: 10a. Please describe:
Part 10a.
10a. Is the archive accessible to scholars, curators or researchers?: 
Yes
Part 10b.
10b. Are there conditions of access for scholars, curators or researchers?: 
Yes
Part 10c.
10c. How are arrangements made for access to archive?: 
People contact us, and we let them see it.
Part 11.
The following questions address the historical materials (type, quantity and storage) of the organization. 11a. Paper Files and Documents: 
Artist Files
Correspondence
Exhibition or Production Files
Financial Records
Legal Documents
Other Paper Files
11b. Artwork and Documentation: 
Audiotapes [Any Format]
Oral History, Recordings and / or Transcripts
Other Audio Recordings (i.e. records, etc.)
CDs / DVDs [Pre-Recorded or CD-R / CD-RW / DVD-R / etc.]
Other Digital Materials
Films
Photographs
Videotapes
Unique Art Objects
Other:: 
Performance Ephemera
11c. Press and Promotional Materials: 
Announcements, Mailing Cards, etc.
Newspaper / Magazine / Media Clippings
Posters / Flyers
Other Press or Promotional Materials - Please describe below.
Other:: 
Posters
11d. Printed Publications: 
Artists' Publications
Brochures
Checklists / Performance Programs / Price Lists
Programs of Events
Publication or Merchandise Catalogues
Other:: 
Other Printed Publications
11e. Other: 
Architectural Drawings / Floor Plan
Costumes
Mock-Ups / Models / Prototypes
Props for Performances
Other:: 
Other
Part 12.
12. What years does the materials cover?: 
1990-1999
2000-2005
Part 13.
13a. How is the material stored?: 
Other Boxes
File Cabinets
Flat Files
13b. Are some or all of these storage units “archival”?: 
Some
I don’t know
Part 14.
14a. Estimated Number of Boxes or Milk-Crate Sized Storage Units: 
11 - 20
14b. Estimated Number of Archive Drawers: 
1 - 10
14c. Estimated Number of Archive Notebooks: 
21 - 30
14d. Estimated the total Linear Feet. ["Linear Feet" is standard measure of the quantity of archival materials on the basis of shelf space occupied or the length of drawers in vertical files or the thickness of horizontally filed materials. For example, a: 
51 - 60
or: 
I don’t know
Other Archive Storage Units - Please describe below.: 
Digital Data, Hard Drives
Part 15.
15. Is the historical materials - or archives - inventoried or catalogued in any way, either formally or otherwise?: 
No
Part 16.
16a. Is there a key, index or finding aid to the materials inventoried?: 
No
16b. Paper-based:: 
Not Applicable
Part 16 / Electronic Files & Archival Management
16f. Does the organization have a back-up program, or back-up schedule, for its electronic records and perform monitoring of its removable media (i.e. floppies, ZIP disks, CD-ROMs, DVDs, portable hard drives, etc.)?: 
Yes
16g. Who is responsible for working with the archival material?: 
General Staff
Part 17.
17. How are new materials processed?: 
No System
Inventory List
Electronic (Database, etc.)
Part 18.
18. What, if any, conservation methods are in place for both physical materials and electronic data?: 
None or Limited
Part 19.
19. What type of climate-controls are present in the area[s] in which the archives are stored?: 
Standard office heating / air conditioning / humidity controls running 24 hours / 7 days
Some heating / air conditioning / humidity controls on demand or sporadically
Limited climate-controls
Part 20.
20a. What are the goals for the historical materials for the next year?: 
Begin archiving
20b. What are the biggest challenges to reaching these short-term goals?: 
Staffing
20c. What goals are in place for the historical materials for the next three to five years?: 
To built a great archive
20d. What are the biggest challenges to reaching these long term goals?: 
Staff
20e. Are there any additional goals for the organizations historic materials?: 
To donate them to the NYPL
Part 21.
21. Estimated cost to achieve these archival goals for the next year.: 
$5,001 - $7,500
Part 22.
22. Estimated cost to achieve these archival goals for the next five years.: 
$7,001 - $10,000
Part 24.
24. What archival issues could / should visual arts organizations address collectively in the next three to five years? Ranked from 1 (highest priority) to 5 (lowest priority).24a. Shared standards / protocols for digitization: 
Promote professional standards / protocols for digitization
Part 25.
25a. Is the organization a member of, or in contact with, any organizations concerned with archival issues?: 
Yes
25b. Who?: 
David Vaughan, archivist, Merce Cunningham Dance COmpany Norton Owen, archivist, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival
Part 26.
26. Additional information, comments, observations, and questions.: 
This is vital to the preservation of live performance as well. A drastic intervention in the financial situation of the performing arts needs to be made at the local, state, and national levels in order for survival to occur. This affects the historical documentation of work.
Finish
survey_field_150: 
Jonah Bokaer
Who executed this survey.: 
Jonah Bokaer
Is this survey complete and all appropriate questions answered?: 
Yes