AS-AP

Survey: Central Arts Collective

Posted August 05, 2010 by Anonymous
Organization: 
Part 1.
Year Founded: 
1981
1c. Organization's annual budget.: 
$0 - $50,000
1b. Primary activity[ies] of the organization.: 
Exhibition Space
Artist Group / Collective
Part 2.
2a. Mission Statement: 
Central Arts provides a forum for contemporary art. We promote and exhibit the work of our own members and guest artists. We are committed to freedom of expression and offer a wide range of artistically, socially, and politically diverse exhibitions. We encourage our members to develop projects that might not otherwise be offered in Tucson, and to collaborate with other non-profit agencies to present the arts. Members are required to commit time, talents and money to maintain and promote the gallery --- circa 2000
2b. Organization History / Organizational Overview. Index of important events in organization's history.: 
The Central Arts Collective was founded in 1981 in Tucson AZ.by a group of local artists. It continued through 2002 after which it faded away. I (Joe Rebholz) was presisent from March 2000 through October 2002. The only documents available to me are some generated during my time as a member. As best I can recall or reconstruct, it was a typical (if there is such a thing) member run collective. Members came and went.over the years, maybe remaining for one or two years. The number of members at any one time was probably about 10. It may have been as high as 20 or 30 at times. Members made all decisions, did all the work, etc. The cooperative survived mostly from members’’ dues and some small grants. It had IRS 501 C(3) non profit status. Below I’’ll include excerpts from a few documents I have. Central Arts Collective A member directed, non-profit artist collective founded in 1981 Central Arts provides a forum for contemporary art. We promote and exhibit the work of our own members and guest artists. We are committed to freedom of expression and offer a wide range of artistically, socially, and politically diverse exhibitions. We encourage our members to develop projects that might not otherwise be offered in Tucson, and to collaborate with other non-profit agencies to present the arts. Members are required to commit time, talents and money to maintain and promote the gallery Membership Responsibilities: A. Participate in monthly meetings B. Pay monthly dues of $25.00 C. Set-up and take-down shows D. Assist during shows by committing time to monitor E. Attend exhibition openings F. Actively work on fund raising events Membership Privileges: A. Voting rights in all decisions involving gallery management B. Voting rights in new member selection C. Inclusions in all arts promotions involving the gallery D. Participation in a group show E. Major show with two or three other members Membership Application checklist: 1. Application form 2. 6-8 slides of current work 3. Resume and artist statement 4. SASE for return of slides 5. Application fee in the amount of $25.00 (check or money order), made out to Central Arts Collective 6. Deadline (postmarked by):_________________________________ 7. Mail to: Central Arts Collective, 300 E. Congress St., Tucson AZ 85701 8. For additional information, please contact: Joe Rebholz, (520) 579 1735. Central Arts Collective, 300 E. Congress St., Tucson AZ 85701, (520) 623-4588, Central Arts Collective is partially supported by: The Arizona Commission on the Arts, and the Tucson/Pima Arts Council. Central Arts Collective A member directed, non-profit artist collective founded in 1981 ______________________________________________________________________________________
2c. Exhibition / Programming / Publishing History.: 
Below is a sample. Central Arts Collective 300 E Congress St. Tucson, AZ 85701 623 4588 2000 - 2001 Show Schedule For all shows, the gallery is open Tues. – Sat., 1 PM – 5 PM, and Downtown Saturday Nights Oct 7, 2000 – Nov 18, 2000: " Tohono: Espacios Del Corazon" Members Glenn Johnson, Cynthia Stewart, and guest Lori Andersen Glenn Johnson: Paintings. An American Indian artist, Glenn Johnson’s vision with landscapes is to attempt to capture those moments in the Sonoran Desert when the light reflects off earth and sky in a mystical, spiritual revelation of color. Cynthia Stewart: Photography. Residing in and drawing inspiration from the Tucson area, Cynthia Stewart’s work conveys a celebration of the beauty of the Sonoran desert with an emphasis on black and white landscape photography and silver-halide printing involving various processing and toning techniques. Her latest foray into black and white infrared imaging will be on display in this show, and plays upon the dramatic contrast variations and luminosity inherent in infrared film to portray mission, shrine, and church sites in the Sonoran desert. Dec. 2, 2000 – Jan. 20, 2001: Nature and Machines. Members Mary Babcock, Jon Fowler, and Joe Rebholz Mary Babcock: Photography, Natural Materials. Her work derives from a deep bodily resonance with the land, its state of objectification and exploitation as well as its resilience … challenging the notion that humans somehow rest outside of and above nature’s space and time. Jon Fowler: Intaglios. Works are inspired by the mechanical age and the industrial revolution. Called Mechanica, his machines and capsules are relatively irrational. Joe Rebholz: Paintings. Seeks a balance between order and chaos, regularity and randomness, inspired by a love of nature and a deep fascination with how the world works. Central Arts Collective 300 E Congress St. Tucson, AZ 85701 623 4588 2000 - 2001 Show Schedule (page 2) Feb. 3, 2001 – Mar. 17, 2001: Revealations and Transformations. Members Sheila Chambers, Carmelita Grabowski, Shirley Oppenheimer, and Glory Tacheenie-Campoy Sheila Chambers: Printmaking, Intaglio, Mixed Media. Sheila Chambers is inspired by the beauty of the world. She finds beauty in simple things that reveal complexity and elegance. She aims for a resonance that connects with others. Carmelita Grabowski: Sculpture. “The flaws and imperfections that people perceive of their bodies are the beauty and individuality that comes out of my art.” Shirley Oppenheimer: Mixed Media, Drawing. Her work takes a closer look at aging women in our society Glory Tacheenie-Campoy: Mixed Media (textile prints, found objects), Original Prints. Glory Tachinee-Campoy, Dine (Navajo), addresses identity, gender, issue art.
Part 4.
4a. Is organization currently active?: 
No
4b. Year activity suspended if no longer active.: 
2002
Part 5.
5a. Type of organization at its founding.: 
Non-Profit [IRS certified]
5b. Type of organization currently, or at the termination of activities.: 
Non-Profit [IRS certified]
Part 6.
6a. Does the organization have an archive?: 
Yes
6b. Are there any short or long-term threats to the organization?: 
None / Not Applicable
6c. Other threats to the organization:: 
Are there other threats to your organization? Please describe below.
Part 7.
7a. How important is to the organization to preserve the organization’s historical material. From 1 – Very Important to 5 – Not Important.: 
3. Neutral
7b. Has planning for the preservation and documentation of archive begun?: 
Not Applicable
7c. Does the organization know how and where to seek expertise and assistance?: 
Not Applicable
7d. Does the organization have specific concerns regarding starting an archive working with its historic materials?: 
Not Applicable
Part 8.
8a. Is the organization's archives in the collection of another institution or promised to one?: 
No
8a. Location: 
IF YES to 8: University (Name)
8b. Archival materials are also located at:: 
No
Where are these locations?: 
Where are these locations? [I.E. Home / Office of Private Individual(s) (i.e. Former Board, Staff, Funders, etc)]
Part 9.
9. Does the organization maintain archives for any other organization.: 
No
survey_field_49: 
IF YES to 9: 10a. Please describe:
Part 10a.
10a. Is the archive accessible to scholars, curators or researchers?: 
No
Part 10d.
10d. Would you allow access in the future?: 
No
Part 11.
The following questions address the historical materials (type, quantity and storage) of the organization. 11a. Paper Files and Documents: 
Artist Files
Board Minutes
Exhibition or Production Files
Other Paper Files
Other:: 
Other Artwork
11c. Press and Promotional Materials: 
Announcements, Mailing Cards, etc.
Other:: 
Other Press or Promotional Materials:
Other:: 
Other Printed Publications
Other:: 
Other
Part 12.
12. What years does the materials cover?: 
2000-2005
Part 13.
13a. How is the material stored?: 
Other - Please describe below.
Please describe: 
computer files
13b. Are some or all of these storage units “archival”?: 
Not Applicable
Part 14.
14a. Estimated Number of Boxes or Milk-Crate Sized Storage Units: 
----
14b. Estimated Number of Archive Drawers: 
----
14c. Estimated Number of Archive Notebooks: 
----
14d. Estimated the total Linear Feet. ["Linear Feet" is standard measure of the quantity of archival materials on the basis of shelf space occupied or the length of drawers in vertical files or the thickness of horizontally filed materials. For example, a: 
----
or: 
Not applicable
Other Archive Storage Units - Please describe below.: 
approx. 20 computer files
Part 15.
15. Is the historical materials - or archives - inventoried or catalogued in any way, either formally or otherwise?: 
Yes
Part 16.
16a. Is there a key, index or finding aid to the materials inventoried?: 
No
16b. Paper-based:: 
Not Applicable
16c. Electronic Based:: 
Word Processing Document [i.e. Word]
Part 16 / Electronic Files & Archival Management
16f. Does the organization have a back-up program, or back-up schedule, for its electronic records and perform monitoring of its removable media (i.e. floppies, ZIP disks, CD-ROMs, DVDs, portable hard drives, etc.)?: 
Yes
16g. Who is responsible for working with the archival material?: 
Other - Please describe below.
Please describe: 
no one
Part 17.
17. How are new materials processed?: 
Other - Please describe below.
Other: 
no new materials
Part 18.
18. What, if any, conservation methods are in place for both physical materials and electronic data?: 
Not Applicable
Part 20.
20a. What are the goals for the historical materials for the next year?: 
no goals
20b. What are the biggest challenges to reaching these short-term goals?: 
N/A
20c. What goals are in place for the historical materials for the next three to five years?: 
none
20d. What are the biggest challenges to reaching these long term goals?: 
N/A
20e. Are there any additional goals for the organizations historic materials?: 
no
Part 21.
21. Estimated cost to achieve these archival goals for the next year.: 
$0
Part 22.
22. Estimated cost to achieve these archival goals for the next five years.: 
$0
Part 23.
23e. Not Applicable: 
Not Applicable
Part 24.
24. What archival issues could / should visual arts organizations address collectively in the next three to five years? Ranked from 1 (highest priority) to 5 (lowest priority).24a. Shared standards / protocols for digitization: 
Promote professional standards / protocols for digitization
24e. Not Applicable: 
Not Applicable
Part 25.
25a. Is the organization a member of, or in contact with, any organizations concerned with archival issues?: 
No
Finish
Who executed this survey.: 
Joe Rebholz
survey_field_149: 
I wish to defer payment and allow AS-AP to use these funds to further AS-AP’s efforts to preserve the history of the alternative and avant-garde movement in America.
Is this survey complete and all appropriate questions answered?: 
Yes